Tag: Residential

By Joe Mander

Woodhouse Farm, Rivenhall

Woodhouse Farm dates back to the early 17th century and is Grade II listed, despite being modified over the years. It lies derelict next to the former RAF Rivenhall site near Whitham however since visiting the site we’ve seen plans which show that the farm will be restored and made into a visitor heritage museum….

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By Liam Heatherson

WW1 Southend & The Palace Hotel

Shortly before BTP Liam wrote this article, he began reading the book ‘Southend at War’ by the excellent local author Dee Gordon. Beyond the Point’s affiliation with the Imperial War Museum Centenary Partnership meant that it would be both appropriate and useful to create a short documentary on Southend in the First World War inspired…

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By Liam Heatherson

Canvey’s Faux Dutch Cottages

Built as a nod to Canvey’s Dutch heritage and the two remaining cottages from the 17th Century, 1930s’ pioneer Lt. Cpl. Fielder built three houses shaped like them yet taller on the ‘Zeeland Estate’. The two survivors, off Long Road down Beechcroft Road, had thatched roofs. The 1930s black and white  photographs are from CanveyIsland.org…

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By Joe Mander

The Atomic Bungalows

Walking past these bungalows you wouldn’t think anything of them – they’re just someone’s average home, but the buildings are far from average, they were supposedly built to withstand an atomic explosion. Following the end of the Second World War, in 1946, plans were submitted to build ‘atomic bungalows’ on Canvey Island. Whilst this was…

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By Liam Heatherson

Rayleigh Mount

What now stands as a strange overgrown mound of earth piling high into the sky, squeezed behind a car park near Rayleigh high street, was once the site of a Norman motte-and-bailey castle. Rayleigh Castle, or Rayleigh Mount as it is sometimes known, was recorded in the Domesday Survey of 1086 and was the only…

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By Liam Heatherson

Shoebury Garrison

The history of the garrison dates back to 1849 when the land was first purchased by the Board of Ordanance. Woolwich Common was usually used for testing weapons, although as they became more powerful, they needed a new, larger site. During the Crimean War, the Royal Artillery School of Gunnery was established at Shoeburyness and…

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By Joe Mander

WW2 Stretcher Fences

In the years leading up to the Second World War the Government ordered the production of hundreds of thousands stretchers. They were built using two metal poles and wire mesh as metal would be easier to clean and disinfect and would be sturdier than wooden or fabric stretchers. Some 600,000 were estimated to have been…

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