Tag: Ruined

By Joe Mander

Woodhouse Farm, Rivenhall

Woodhouse Farm dates back to the early 17th century and is Grade II listed, despite being modified over the years. It lies derelict next to the former RAF Rivenhall site near Whitham however since visiting the site we’ve seen plans which show that the farm will be restored and made into a visitor heritage museum….

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By Joe Mander

Tendring ROC & Orlit Posts

Situated close to Tendring Primary School are the remains are two observations posts which would have been used during the Cold War, should it have actually happened. Shown around by Thomas and Austin, the ROC Post is in a fairly good condition although has been stripped of most of the original furniture. Hundreds of these…

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By Joe Mander

North Woolwich Station

North Woolwich Station opened back in 1846, making it one of London’s oldest surviving stations. The Grade II listed building in East London was using steam trains when it opened and only moved over to diesel locomotives in 1963. It was originally built to serve Woolwich, on the south side of the river, as the…

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By Joe Mander

Pegwell Bay Hoverport

Pegwell Bay dates back to as far as Roman times and is thought to be the site of where Julius Caesar invaded Britain. In 2017 a fort dating back to 54BC was discovered, confirming this fact. Fast forward the centuries and in 1969 ‘Ramsgate International Hoverport’ was open for business, officially opened by the Duke…

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By Liam Heatherson

Millennium Mills

Many comprehensive histories of the mills have been written online, so here is just a very brief overview of their past, present, and future. The grain mills at Silvertown are perhaps one of the last substantial remnants of London’s docklands and a symbol of their decline in the light of the area’s very contrasting redevelopment….

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By Joe Mander

Cooling Radio Station

As the world entered the 20th Century, technology was advancing at a rapid rate and communication between the UK and America was already wired with a transatlantic submarine cable. Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi was an expert in radio transmission and developed the first system which allowed wireless transmission from Cornwall to New Foundland, US. Following…

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By Joe Mander

Reigate Army Battle Headquarters

Prime Minister Winston Churchill was after a location for a new, secret, Army Battle Headquarters and came across the perfect location in Reigate; an old chalk quarry with easy access by car and a vantage vantage point on top of the tunnels that has a view stretching miles. It’s also rumoured that some of the…

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By Joe Mander

Hollingbourne Zero Station

If German forces were successful in invading Britain during the Second World War, the dozens of Zero stations would have come into operation. They were designed so that spies could secretly give information to out stations, before the coded information was passed on via radio to zero stations who would then inform the Special Duties…

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